Solidarity is For White Women


Sarah Darkmagic - Posted on 13 August 2013

It's not often that I talk about a Twitter hashtag that isn't directly connected to gaming, but this is an important one. The hashtag is #solidarityisforwhitewomen and it was started by Mikki Kendall aka @Karnythia on Twitter.

The backstory appears to be this. There was a man who for years identified as a male feminist and who, even though he did a number of things that didn't seem very feminist, apparently being involved with a planned murder-suicide, allegations of sleeping with students, and allegedly standing in the way of some women's careers, women in power in feminist circles supported and even promoted him. Race comes into this because he and those who sided with him were predominantly white whereas those he harmed were women of color.

It gets even more difficult because this particular case isn't the only example of the women in the positions of power not understanding intersectionality, that is, not understanding how they were using racism and racist imagery to their benefits. For instance, in 2008, Amanda Marcotte released a book that used artwork of "natives" to talk about represent battling against the forces of "fundamentalists and antichoicers."

So what we have is a feeling that the experiences of one group of women, in this case those of upper-class white women, are universalized to those of all women. You are either with that program or you are not. If you are, it's easier to rise through the ranks and perhaps even earn a coveted paying gig in all of this. If you're not, you are told that not only are you not good enough, but that you are "hurting the cause." To add further insult to injury, it appears easier for a man to climb those ranks than for a woman who doesn't fit the predominant narrative, this in a movement that claims it's for equality.

And yes, I know that means it's been, for the most part easier for me. I know this because once I could compartmentalize some of my lower class outlooks and ways of thinking, I was able to go pretty far before hitting the next big road bump. This is not the case for everyone as a number of my fellow classmates from Dartmouth remind me every day.

And so, Kendall created the awesome hashtag #solidarityisforwhitewomen because regardless of how I or other (mostly) white women might feel about it, that's the feeling that's out there. And it's way important to know it's there and to see how we can make ourselves better. But to do that, we need to listen.

HuffPost Live did a great interview with Tara Conley ( @taralconley ) and Mikki Kendall ( @Karnythia ).

Other resources:

What can people like me do?

Often during times like this, people want to know what they can do. Here are some suggestions:

  • Over the next few days or weeks, look at those who used the hash tag and see if any of them share interests with you. If they do, why not follow them? I've been doing this for about a year or so now and I've found all sorts of awesome stuff and new perspectives as a result.
  • As much as possible, if you are part of the group that finds it easy to get an outlet for your voice, use your voice to magnify those who have a harder time. Do your best to not use your voice as an attempt to silence them.
  • Read up on primary sources of history. Seriously, you might find out that what you think of as "historical fact" is actually someone's "historical fiction" or perhaps even "historical fantasy."

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